Cutting for Stone

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Cutting for Stone

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Cutting for Stone

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I really enjoyed the book. The narrative takes place over 30 years and I became deeply attached to the characters. I thought the characters were well developed and the story line kept my attention. I also enjoyed the setting of Ethiopia for much of the novel and was surprised by how little I knew about the country. There were some tough scenes in the book that the squeamish might not care for (surgeries, some disturbing sexual scenes). It took a little while to get into the book but once it had my attention I would think about it during the day and look forward to being able to read it at night. That is always the sign of a good book for me. By: Lauren Murray

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This 667 page novel grabbed my attention from the very beginning and kept me intrigued till the very last page. The setting is exotic, the characters complex and exquisitely developed, and then there is another aspect to the book that is indeed unique. The practice of medicine is endemic to the story and reading this book taught me more about the body and bodily functions than I have ever thought about before. The story begins in Ethiopia where the author himself was born to Indian parents, and the setting is a hospital there where the details of medical practice are also a part of the story.

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Cutting for Stone Basically, there is a forbidden romance between a young Indian nun and a brilliant English physician resulting in the birth of Siamese twins who are separated at birth though the skill of a medical team. The young nun dies, the physician runs away and the two boys are brought up by a Indian female obstetrician and her doctor husband. This is the story of these two brothers, the land they grew up in and the people around them. And, unique to this book, every incident is rich with detailed descriptions of medical practices, giving me, as a reader a true appreciation of the complexity of the body and how it works.

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After the dramatic first part of the book, I wondered if the author could sustain the tension throughout. And he certainly did. As the book went on it shifted to a first-person narrative of one of the twin brothers. Though his eyes, I felt the coming of age of the two brothers, the essence of Ethiopia with its political uprisings, primitive medical practices, and eventual revolution, forcing him to emigrate to America as a young immigrant doctor. He has a love interest in a woman the brothers knew from childhood, the daughter of one of the servants who was expected to be a doctor but who was the victim of primitive ritual, Ethiopian nationalism and, later, a sad a sorrowful life.

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This a fine book. The medical details enriched the story. The personalities were interesting and complex. There were constant surprises and new developments. And, just when I would think I knew where the story was going, there would be another twist that would take me down a brand new road. I loved this book. Don’t miss it Cutting for Stone! By: Linda Linguvic

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Cutting for Stone

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